A Travellerspoint blog

Rajasthan and Surrounds

sunny 16 °C

We're passing through Jaipur, the Pink City once again. Luckily, the Pearl Palace Heritage, our favorite hotel and as I mentioned in an earlier post, one of the locations for the 2nd Best Marigold Hotel film, has a room for us. At, 2400 rupees (30 euros), this is the best deal in the country! Every room is unique, with super comfy beds, ultra modern bathrooms, and an incredibly attentive staff. A restaurant is still in the works, but they do offer some room service. Our room called Madhubani, in reference to a style of Indo-Nepalese painting, was painted by a 12 year old girl! Over the course of one year, she and her family came during every school vacation so that she could complete the project.
Hand-painted walls, Pearl Palace Heritage Hotel, Jaipur, Rajasthan

Hand-painted walls, Pearl Palace Heritage Hotel, Jaipur, Rajasthan


Stepping into Royal Gems and Arts, Santi Choudary's shop which occupies a portion of his ancestral haveli (mansion), we have no idea that we'll be spending the better part of the day viewing a priceless collection of family jewels. The shop itself is magnificent. Every inch of wall is either intricately painted or covered in mirror work and accessorized with paintings of family members dressed in full regalia.
Royal Gems and Arts, Jaipur Rajasthan

Royal Gems and Arts, Jaipur Rajasthan


When I mention that my mother has just seen an exhibition of Rajasthani jewels at the Metropolitan Museum in NY, Mr. Choudary tells me that he was there for the opening as a few pieces, originally from his collection, are in the show. And thus begins a presentation of exquisite jewels, centuries old. Turban brooches, bracelets, sword casings, necklaces, rings, are brought out one at a time, each with an elaborate box shaped according to the piece. One, I swear is THE holy grail, encrusted with diamonds, emeralds and rubies.
Diamond, ruby and emerald ornament, Jaipur, Rajasthan

Diamond, ruby and emerald ornament, Jaipur, Rajasthan


Although we are free to touch, we hesitate to handle such extraordinary pieces. With genuine Indian hospitality, tea is served, and as the hours go by, nuts, sandwiches, fresh pomegranate, cakes, more tea... The experience is remarkable.

The Keoladeo Ghana Wildlife Sanctuary is located in Bharatpur. Cars and jeeps are not allowed inside the park, but bicycle rickshaws make for a lovely visit.
Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan


Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan

Keoladeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Bharatpur, Rajasthan


A 45 minute cramped bus gets us to Deeg to visit the 18th century summer palace of the rulers of Bharatpur.
Not the cleanest bus

Not the cleanest bus

Some of the interiors are accessible and it's easy to imagine the royal family living here. The grounds are beautifully maintained with various pavilions and a large tank (man-made lake).
Deeg Palace, Rajasthan

Deeg Palace, Rajasthan


Living Room, Deeg Palace, Rajasthan

Living Room, Deeg Palace, Rajasthan


Dining Room, Deeg Palace, Rajasthan

Dining Room, Deeg Palace, Rajasthan

Renovations, Deeg Palace, Rajasthan

Renovations, Deeg Palace, Rajasthan

Deeg Palace, Rajasthan

Deeg Palace, Rajasthan

The City Palace in Alwar has been converted into government offices.
City Palace, Alwar, Rajasthan

City Palace, Alwar, Rajasthan


City Palace, Alwar, Rajasthan

City Palace, Alwar, Rajasthan


Renovations, City Palace, Alwar, Rajasthan

Renovations, City Palace, Alwar, Rajasthan

Renovations, City Palace, Alwar, Rajasthan

Renovations, City Palace, Alwar, Rajasthan


Under a covered recess in the main courtyard, a group of guys have set up a badminton net. They play for about an hour, then suddenly, as if someone yelled "fire", they swiftly dismantle the court and ride off on their motorbikes.
Playing badminton at City Palace, Alwar, Rajasthan

Playing badminton at City Palace, Alwar, Rajasthan


Moss-covered tank (lake), City Palace, Alwar, Rajasthan

Moss-covered tank (lake), City Palace, Alwar, Rajasthan


Moosi Rani Ki Chhatri, the cenotaph of Raja Bakhtawar Singh and Rani Moosi, Alwar, Rajasthan

Moosi Rani Ki Chhatri, the cenotaph of Raja Bakhtawar Singh and Rani Moosi, Alwar, Rajasthan


About 20 minutes away, we try to visit the Vijay Mandir (palace) but it is no longer open to the public as it now houses a school and orphanage. We hike all the way around the (somewhat dried) lake and climb up a hill to get the view we've seen pictures of.
Vijay Mandir palace, near Alwar, Rajasthan

Vijay Mandir palace, near Alwar, Rajasthan


Jhunjhunu, Rajasthan

Jhunjhunu, Rajasthan

Kite flying, Jhunjhunu, Rajasthan

Kite flying, Jhunjhunu, Rajasthan


Every once in awhile, we come across a really special place. In the south it was the Chettinad region. Here in northern Rajasthan it is the Shekawati region. Like their contemporaries in the south, wealthy merchants built havelis, palaces and forts in towns like Churu, Fatehpur, Nawalgarh and Mandawa to showcase their wealth. The signature of a Shekawati haveli is the frescos painted on the inside AND outside walls.
Mandawa, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Mandawa, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Mandawa, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Mandawa, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Mandawa, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Mandawa, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Wrapping a turban, Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Wrapping a turban, Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Funeral procession, Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Funeral procession, Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan


Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Nawalgarh, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan


We spend a few nights in Mandawa where several havelis and castles have been converted into hotels. While the Mandawa Castle is most famous and luxurious, we choose the Mandawa Haveli, a smaller, charming property. All rooms, on 3 floors, open onto the central courtyard and the walls are beautifully painted.
Mandawa Castle, Shekawati region, Rajasthan

Mandawa Castle, Shekawati region, Rajasthan

Mandawa Castle, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan

Mandawa Castle, Shekhawati region, Rajasthan


Haveli wall painting, woman giving birth, Mandawa, Rajasthan

Haveli wall painting, woman giving birth, Mandawa, Rajasthan

Sneh Ram Ladia Haveli, Mandawa, Rajasthan

Sneh Ram Ladia Haveli, Mandawa, Rajasthan

Main street of Mandawa, Shekawati, Rajasthan

Main street of Mandawa, Shekawati, Rajasthan

Hotel, Mandawa Haveli, Rajasthan

Hotel, Mandawa Haveli, Rajasthan

Interior courtyard of our hotel, Mandawa Haveli, Rajasthan

Interior courtyard of our hotel, Mandawa Haveli, Rajasthan

Our room, Mandawa Haveli, Rajasthan

Our room, Mandawa Haveli, Rajasthan


Daytime temps are perfect, but it's really cold at night and there's no such thing as central heating. The manager brings us a small electric heater which heats the space directly in front of the grill, neither to the left, nor the right. The bathroom on the other side of the room, with its smooth stone floor is especially cold despite steaming hot water. There are 2 types of bathrooms in India, Wet and Dry. Among other nuances, Dry infers that the shower is separate and therefore the floor in the rest of the room stays dry. Dry bathrooms are not yet in the mainstream but newer constructions are incorporating the idea. In 97% of the places we stay, even some of the nicer hotels, as soon as you take a shower the entire floor gets wet. It's almost bearable during the hot summer, but here it's cold and the minute even the hottest water hits the floor, it freezes! Wet bathrooms are up there on my list of things I dislike the most in India.

New Years Eve festivities begin with afternoon tea on the rooftop terrace. As night falls, a local ensemble accompanies a couple of traditional dancers. Small campfires, strategically placed throughout the property make it possible to enjoy the outdoor festivities. It's magical, though we wonder about residual damage to the frescoes. A feast is served throughout the evening, fireworks block out the stars at midnight, and the best part is that it all takes place in front of our room.
Mandawa Haveli, Shekawati region, Rajasthan

Mandawa Haveli, Shekawati region, Rajasthan


New Years Eve, Mandawa Haveli, Shekawati region, Rajasthan

New Years Eve, Mandawa Haveli, Shekawati region, Rajasthan


We head back to Delhi for a few days on our way to Agra to visit the Taj Mahal.
Fog at New Delhi Airport

Fog at New Delhi Airport


Fog in New Delhi

Fog in New Delhi

Bicycle rickshaw driver, New Delhi

Bicycle rickshaw driver, New Delhi

New Delhi

New Delhi

Piece by Subodh Gupta, Museum of Modern Art, New Delhi

Piece by Subodh Gupta, Museum of Modern Art, New Delhi

New Delhi at night

New Delhi at night

Bicycle rickshaw, New Delhi

Bicycle rickshaw, New Delhi

Lohri bonfire, celebrating the Winter Soltice, New Delhi

Lohri bonfire, celebrating the Winter Soltice, New Delhi

Cold night in New Delhi

Cold night in New Delhi


Agra is in full scale preparations for the visit of President Obama scheduled in 2 days. There are huge billboards welcoming him, traffic has been diverted, the police presence has quadrupled and... it's raining.
Agra, Uttar Pradesh

Agra, Uttar Pradesh


We check-in to a dump and shiver through the night. The next day, the sun shines brightly for our visit. There is perhaps no other place in the country with greater contrast between clean and dirty. The (auto) rickshaw ride through streets of Agra is shocking. How is it possible that the home to one of the top 3 tourist attractions in the world can be so filthy? And don't get me started on the touts trying to sell you everything, practically fighting with each other to grab your attention. Agra is by no means representative of India, though it should be given the importance of its tourist attractions. You just feel like running. But once you get through security, everything melts away in front of the pristine beauty of the Taj. Unfortunately, Obama changes his itinerary and Agra gets dropped. It's a real shame as this important visit might have kindled a renaissance for the city which has suffered from declining tourism.
Taj Mahal, Agra, Uttar Pradesh

Taj Mahal, Agra, Uttar Pradesh

Taj Mahal, Agra, Uttar Pradesh

Taj Mahal, Agra, Uttar Pradesh


We board the bus to Mathura the next day in pouring rain thinking how lucky we were at the Taj Mahal! About an hour into the ride, as I peer in between too many people standing in the aisle, I notice that the bus has no windshield wipers...

Everything is uglier in the rain. We have a hard time finding a hotel, supposedly because of Obama's visit. In order to accept foreigners, Indian hotels are required to submit an inordinate amount of paperwork to the police. True, security is beefed up these days, but sometimes, they just can't be bothered and you can tell.

Mathura, is believed to be the birthplace of Lord Krishna over 3000 years ago. In a small room at the Kesava Deo temple, lies the stone slab on which Krishna was born. Twice a day, the room fills with devotees who wait anxiously for the curtain to be opened. I jostle for position in the front row and count down 8 interminable minutes with the large ticking clock on the wall wondering what's behind the thick velvet curtain that has the crowd in such a frenzy of anticipation. As the only pale face, standing a head over everyone, people smile and stare. One man says to me, "This is the birthplace of my god; I'm so happy." It's touching. As the clock strikes the hour, a man jumps up to opens the curtain, and a collective breath is released, revealing a small stone slab surrounded by a variety of silver objects, flowers and incense. The emotion is palpable, well for them anyway.
Mathura also draws massive numbers of pilgrims who come to bathe at the ghats (steps leading to the river) on the Jamuna river.
Vishram Temple and Ghat, Mathura, Uttar Pradesh

Vishram Temple and Ghat, Mathura, Uttar Pradesh


Vrindavan is the town where Krishna grew up and home to the International Society for Krishna Consciousness, aka Hare Krishna. Founder, Swami Prabhupada, is buried here in a beautiful setting. The temple is more like a village and includes a hotel, restaurants, souvenir shops and of course membership services. In the main hall, dozens of people sit in groups chanting the familiar Hare Krishna, Maha Mantra.

Vrindavan has many temples dedicated to Krishna. The most amusing is the Prem Mandir from the entrance gate to the main temple. As the sun sets, the temple lights up with a rainbow of colored lights, shifting hues seamlessly.
Prem Mandir Temple, Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh

Prem Mandir Temple, Vrindavan, Uttar Pradesh


Firozabad is famous for 2 things; lights and bangles. With fierce competition from the Chinese, whose lighting shops share the real estate on the main road, every type of light imaginable from mass market fixtures to top quality reproductions and made to order pieces, is manufactured here for worldwide export. We visit a few manufacturing facilities including one particularly reputable firm whose A-list clients include luxury hotels and palaces. Most impressive are the traditional, manual techniques of glass blowing, polishing and engraving used.
Glass blowing, Firozabad, Uttar Pradesh

Glass blowing, Firozabad, Uttar Pradesh

Glass blowing, Firozabad, Uttar Pradesh

Glass blowing, Firozabad, Uttar Pradesh

Glass blowing, Firozabad, Uttar Pradesh

Glass blowing, Firozabad, Uttar Pradesh


In addition to the usual mayhem in the streets, men pulling carts loaded with colorful glass bangles weave their way through traffic. Considering that ALL Indian women wear bangles everyday and change them to match their outfits, this is seriously big business. I'm often asked why I'm not wearing bangles. Indian women just don't get that you cannot travel wearing a sari and covered with jewelry. Even the poorest women don armfuls of bangles, ankle bracelets, toe rings, and gold.
Firozabad, Uttar Pradesh - Bangle capital of India

Firozabad, Uttar Pradesh - Bangle capital of India


Wedding ceremony, Firozabad, Uttar Pradesh

Wedding ceremony, Firozabad, Uttar Pradesh

Hanuman (monkey god) Firozabad, Uttar Pradesh

Hanuman (monkey god) Firozabad, Uttar Pradesh


Another one of these cities off the classic tourist track, but well worth a visit is Gwalior. The 19th century Jai Vilas Palace, home to the Scindia family claims to have 2 of the biggest chandeliers in the world. In any case, to be sure the ceiling could hold each 3.5 ton piece, 10 elephants were hoisted onto the roof to test the structure! Today the chandeliers use bulbs, but originally, each held 250 candles. The chandeliers are only turned on for special occasions as they are a big strain on the palace's electrical grid, but we are in the right place at the right time. The palace is hosting a group from the Maharaja's Express (luxury tourist train) and for the duration of their tour the chandeliers are lit. The walls, covered in gold leaf, shimmer.
Jai Vilas Palace Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

Jai Vilas Palace Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

Jai Vilas Palace Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

Jai Vilas Palace Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh


It's a hike up to Gwalior Fort on a switchback road but the payoff is 360° views and pretty paintings inside and out on the various palaces and temples. Certainly the most peculiar is the row of yellow ducks (and other animals) painted on the exterior of the Man Singh Palace.
Gwalior Fort, Madhya Pradesh

Gwalior Fort, Madhya Pradesh

Gwalior Fort, Madhya Pradesh

Gwalior Fort, Madhya Pradesh

View from Gwalior Fort, Madhya Pradesh

View from Gwalior Fort, Madhya Pradesh

View from Gwalior Fort, Madhya Pradesh

View from Gwalior Fort, Madhya Pradesh

Gwalior Fort, Madhya Pradesh

Gwalior Fort, Madhya Pradesh


Carved into rock walls along another road on the way down are gigantic figures representing the 24 Jain divinities. One stands 17 meters tall.
Jain Tirthankaras (religious teachers) carved in the rock near Gwalior Fort, Madyha Pradesh

Jain Tirthankaras (religious teachers) carved in the rock near Gwalior Fort, Madyha Pradesh

Jain Tirthankaras (religious teachers) near Gwalior Fort, Madyha Pradesh

Jain Tirthankaras (religious teachers) near Gwalior Fort, Madyha Pradesh


At breakfast, scrambled eggs require a long wait, but fried (sunny side up) eggs are available right away. We don't even bother to try and understand that logic, we have a bus to catch!
Gwalior bus stand, keeping warm by the fire in the ticket office!

Gwalior bus stand, keeping warm by the fire in the ticket office!

Bus, food vendor, Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

Bus, food vendor, Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh

Dog, Gwalior, Madyha Pradesh

Dog, Gwalior, Madyha Pradesh

Night bus to Lucknow in the fog

Night bus to Lucknow in the fog

Night bus to Lucknow in the fog

Night bus to Lucknow in the fog


There are hardly any tourists in Lucknow, yet there are enough historical sites to fill 2 days. And, given the time, what better, ecological, way to visit than by cycle rickshaw, I used to feel bad about someone lugging us around, but I'm over it. We pass through the Rumi (Roomi) Darwaza a copy of a gate in Istanbul from the Byzantine era, to reach the Bara Imambara and Chota Imambara mausoleums dedicated to Shia Muslim saints.
What was the architect thinking? Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh

What was the architect thinking? Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh

Bara Imambara, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh

Bara Imambara, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh

Shah Najaf Imambara, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh

Shah Najaf Imambara, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh

Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh

Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh


Khajuraho is famous for its erotic temples dating as far back as 950 AD. Classified by UNESCO, the temples have been carefully refurbished and the grounds are impeccable. The site is a major tourist attraction which implies the peripheral touts and souvenir shops, but nothing too unbearable. Besides, touristy spots do have some positive aspects including other food options, better wifi connections and real cappuccinos. The Siddhartha Hotel is a comfortable budget option in the perfect location across the street from the main group of temples. The street is only open to pedestrians and meals are served on the roof-deck overlooking the temples.
View from the bus on the way to Khajuraho

View from the bus on the way to Khajuraho

Jagadamba and Kandariya Mahadev temples, Khajuraho, Madhya Pradesh

Jagadamba and Kandariya Mahadev temples, Khajuraho, Madhya Pradesh

Lakshmana temple, Khajuraho, Madyha Pradesh

Lakshmana temple, Khajuraho, Madyha Pradesh

Chitragupta Temple, Khajuraho, Madyha Pradesh

Chitragupta Temple, Khajuraho, Madyha Pradesh

Kandariya Mahadeva temple, Khajuraho, Madyha Pradesh

Kandariya Mahadeva temple, Khajuraho, Madyha Pradesh

Jagadambi temple, Khajuraho, Madyha Pradesh

Jagadambi temple, Khajuraho, Madyha Pradesh

Kandariya Mahadeva temple, Khajuraho, Madyha Pradesh

Kandariya Mahadeva temple, Khajuraho, Madyha Pradesh

Everyone enjoying the warmth of the fire, Khajuraho, Madyha Pradesh

Everyone enjoying the warmth of the fire, Khajuraho, Madyha Pradesh


Cappuccino designs

Cappuccino designs


The train to Orchha is epic.
Train to Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Train to Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Train to Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Train to Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Train to Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Train to Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Train to Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Train to Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

What we don't know is that on this and every full moon, thousands of Hindus flock to the town to honor Lord Rama at the temple in the center of town. Someone motions to us that we have arrived. Wondering why we can't see the station, or even the platform, we gather our bags and head to the exit. It turns out there is no platform because the train is longer than the station! It's a 2 foot drop to the ground and then a slow shuffle with people jostling and elbowing ahead along the side of the train. On the road the scene is incredible. Shared rickshaws are frantically squeezing people in and rushing off while empty ones come screeching back for the next load.
Arriving in Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Arriving in Orchha, Madyha Pradesh


It's 10 rupees (5 cents) per person and they manage to stuff 12-15 people in a rickshaw designed for 4 max... Being the big spenders that we are, we wait until the crowd thins and then pay the full 2 bucks for a private ride into town. Finding a hotel room is equally trying, but we land a room at the brand new, Heritage Guest House. It's laughable, but the manager and his assistant are extremely kind and do everything to make us comfortable.
Dinner with a cow, Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Dinner with a cow, Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Sadhu, (person who relinquishes worldly pleasures), Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Sadhu, (person who relinquishes worldly pleasures), Orchha, Madyha Pradesh


Pigments, Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Pigments, Orchha, Madyha Pradesh


By the next evening the town is completely deserted.
Jahangir Mahal (citadel), Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Jahangir Mahal (citadel), Orchha, Madyha Pradesh

Orchha Chhatris (cenotaphs) on Betwa river, Madyha Pradesh

Orchha Chhatris (cenotaphs) on Betwa river, Madyha Pradesh

Orchha Chaturbhuj Temple, Madyha Pradesh

Orchha Chaturbhuj Temple, Madyha Pradesh

Orchha Chhatris (cenotaphs) on Betwa river, Madyha Pradesh

Orchha Chhatris (cenotaphs) on Betwa river, Madyha Pradesh

Orchha, Betwa river, Madyha Pradesh

Orchha, Betwa river, Madyha Pradesh


We're making our way (back) to Jodhpur for a royal wedding. To break up the long bus rides, we stop in Kota to visit the beautiful palace that sits inside the expansive fort. It's got the de rigueur palace fittings: elaborately mirrored halls, stuffed tigers and colorful wall paintings.
Kota Fort Palace, Rajasthan

Kota Fort Palace, Rajasthan

Maharaja's bedroom, Kota Fort Palace, Rajasthan

Maharaja's bedroom, Kota Fort Palace, Rajasthan

Street scene, Kota, Rajasthan

Street scene, Kota, Rajasthan

Street scene, Kota, Rajasthan

Street scene, Kota, Rajasthan

Street scene, Kota, Rajasthan

Street scene, Kota, Rajasthan

Next up, the Jodhpuri wedding, I promise!

Posted by SpiceChronicles 13:42 Archived in India Comments (3)

Incredibly, more India

sunny 18 °C


Yes, yes, still in India, and it's not the last post on this vast country. We are nearing the end of a year here, yet there is still so much to see.

Dhrangadhra's got the feel of a frontier town. A dusty main street, lined with peddlers selling the usual; fruits, vegetables, plastic, metal and rubber objects, clothing, chai and pan (the chew and spit stuff whose indelible red stains are splattered on walls and pavement throughout the country). I still flinch every time someone spits or smiles at me with crimson teeth. Our auto-rickshaw stops at several "hotels" before we settle on the "best" option. It's 8 euros for the night; no sink in the bathroom, but cable TV and a James Bond film about to start.We're up and out at dawn to visit, I'm not making this up, the Wild Ass Sanctuary.
Dawn in Dhrangadhra, Gujarat

Dawn in Dhrangadhra, Gujarat

En route to the Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

En route to the Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

Nomads. En route to the Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

Nomads. En route to the Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

The arid plains of this western-most part of India are home to the last wild asses of Asia. They are actually beautiful chestnut-colored creatures resembling sturdy horses.
Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

Wide cracks in the ground attest to the dry season, but as my heels sink, I immediately understand that this visible layer is deceiving; even dangerous.
Seemingly dry ground, Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

Seemingly dry ground, Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

In the distance, thousands of Pink Flamingos on their winter reproduction junket, stand knee-deep on pink stilts in the shallows. We try to approach without disturbing, but they sense our presence from afar and retreat with a rumbling flutter.
Pink Flamingos, Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

Pink Flamingos, Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

Seasonal migration, Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

Seasonal migration, Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

Sarus Crane - Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

Sarus Crane - Wild Ass Sanctuary, Gujarat

Ahmedabad, Amdavad, Ahmadabad, Ahemdavad. All spellings are correct for the main city in the state of Gujarat, famous for several things, not the least being Gandhi's headquarters for over 20 years, and stepping-stone in Nagendra Modi's ascension to Prime Minister - the latter scoring bonus points for organizing Obama's recent (2nd) visit to India. The city seems cleaner than average which I'm convinced is due to the fact that most of the streets are paved with finished sidewalks. There isn't that corridor of dirt along the side of the road that gets whipped up with a breeze or turns to mud when wet.

We check-in to the Ambassador Hotel (35 euros), and as per our routine, make a quick survey to assure that there are towels, soap, remotes, clean sheets, etc. There's usually something missing, and it's best to get everything upfront and settled. The staff in many hotels, usually very kind and eager, have either no training or the most unusual sense of service - they knock but never wait before entering, bring you single sheets for a double bed... You have to bolt the door to avoid surprise visits. In India, privacy and personal space exist only in a foreigner's language. And in many hotels, if you're not at breakfast by 9:30, you get a phone call.
Our room, Ambassador Hotel, Ahmedabad, Gujarat (33 euros)

Our room, Ambassador Hotel, Ahmedabad, Gujarat (33 euros)

The auto-rickshaw we've hired for the day, proves to be a challenge as the driver hardly speaks English and we have to fight with him to follow our agenda. The Sidi Saiyyad's Mosque is clear: Ladies are not allowed "under ANY circumstances", but everyone is welcome to admire the sculpted columns and Hindu and Jain architectural elements of the Jama Masjid mosque which is rather quiet at this time in-between prayers.
Jama Masjid, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jama Masjid, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jama Masjid, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jama Masjid, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jama Masjid, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jama Masjid, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

In contrast, the congregation at the Swaminarayan Temple is eager for us to join the women singing their hearts out.

Ladies singing at Swaminarayan Temple, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Ladies singing at Swaminarayan Temple, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Tomb of Sultan Ahmad Shahi, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Tomb of Sultan Ahmad Shahi, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Rani's Hajira, Tomb of the Queens, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Rani's Hajira, Tomb of the Queens, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Sidi Bashir Mosque, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Sidi Bashir Mosque, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Life in India is happening in the streets at all hours and sometimes in the oddest places. In an empty lot near the center of town, nowhere near a mine, a small group of men and women are busy loading/unloading coal into trucks.
Coal workers, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Coal workers, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Coal workers, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Coal workers, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Coal workers, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Coal workers, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Coal workers, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Coal workers, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Down the road, some men are dyeing yards of thread on the sidewalk as traffic hurries by.
Dyeing thread, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Dyeing thread, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Dyeing thread, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Dyeing thread, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Most extraordinary is the 15th century Dada-Hari-Vav step-well, a succession of platforms of intricately sculpted stone columns, connected by steep steps descending into pools of "fresh" water. Like an M.C. Escher drawing, it is a masterpiece of design and function
Dada-Hari-Vav step-well, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Dada-Hari-Vav step-well, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Dada-Hari-Vav step-well, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Dada-Hari-Vav step-well, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

The city has quite a large Jain community whose temples are made of thick, blinding-white marble and filled with gold and silver ornaments. We're up early for the Jain Heritage walk, organized by the cultural center located in the Diwanji Ni Haveli. Led by an historian, we wind our way through the labyrinth of streets in the old city stopping to visit 25 of the 140 Jain temples.
Jain Heritage Walk, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jain Heritage Walk, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jain Heritage Walk, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jain Heritage Walk, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jain Heritage Walk, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jain Heritage Walk, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jain Heritage Walk, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jain Heritage Walk, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jain Heritage Walk, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Jain Heritage Walk, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

One of many sweet Indian dogs, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

One of many sweet Indian dogs, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Along the way, we stop to admire the beauty and ingenuity of traditional Havelis (private mansions) made of Burmese teak. Every aspect is designed for coolness in the summer and managing the monsoon season. Homes face east or west, with windows north and south to create a cross breeze. All roofs are slanted with gutters (channels) to collect water. An ingenious underground system of lime and stone, concealed from the sun to avoid the growth of bacteria, filters water through copper pipes removing impurities. Ahmedabad is the only city where rainwater has been harvested by tradition.
Mangaldas ni Haveli, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Mangaldas ni Haveli, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Entrance to the City Museum Ahmedabad, designed by Le Corbusier, Gujarat

Entrance to the City Museum Ahmedabad, designed by Le Corbusier, Gujarat

Market stand, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

Market stand, Ahmedabad, Gujarat

About 100 kms north of Ahmedabad near the town of Modhera, and a bit out of the way when you rely on public transport, is the magnificent Sun Temple. Built in the 11th century, the temple was designed so that the rising sun illuminates the effigy of Surya, the sun god.
Modhera Sun Temple, Gujarat

Modhera Sun Temple, Gujarat

Modhera Sun Temple, Gujarat

Modhera Sun Temple, Gujarat

Modhera Sun Temple, Gujarat

Modhera Sun Temple, Gujarat

Modhera Sun Temple, Gujarat

Modhera Sun Temple, Gujarat

Catching a bus to our next destination is no small matter. But stand on the side of the road long enough and something always happens. An overloaded jeep makes just enough room and we're off.

We arrive in Patan with a specific hotel in mind. As usual, touts, eager to take you to the places who will pay commission, tell us the hotel no longer exists. As usual, we insist on our choice. For the first time, the hotel has actually closed! However, we are not here for the hotel, but rather to visit the beautiful 11th century, Rani-ki-Vav step-well.
Rani-ki-Vav step-well, Patan, Rajasthan

Rani-ki-Vav step-well, Patan, Rajasthan

Rani-ki-Vav Step-well, Patan, Rajasthan

Rani-ki-Vav Step-well, Patan, Rajasthan

If there were frequent flyer miles for buses, we'd be platinum members by now. We've got the system for getting good seats worked out. First, always take the bus from its starting point if possible, and second, be willing to elbow your way on if the seats are not reserved. It can be a nasty few minutes, and chivalry is another one of those foreign words, but once you've claimed your seat, it's smiles all around. The advantage of the bus, unlike the train, is that you don't have to plan far in advance.
Bus station, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Bus station, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Street scene, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Street scene, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

In 1971, when the Privy Purse (an allowance given to royal families of the princely states to compensate their loss of ruling rights (and income) at India's independence in1947) was revoked, in order to maintain their estates, many families converted portions of their properties into hotels. It is entirely possible to visit India and spend every night of your trip in a palace or mansion especially in Rajasthan.

The Udai Bilas Palace, part home to the royal family, part luxury hotel, sits on the lake in Dungarpur. The interior courtyard is a masterpiece of carved stone and marble. The Maharaja also has an impressive collection of vintage cars.
Udai Bilas Palace, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Udai Bilas Palace, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Udai Bilas Palace, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Udai Bilas Palace, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Perched on a hill across town, in desperate need of repair, and sadly, not likely to get it, is the 13th century Juna Mahal. The palace is a vertical labyrinth of steps, narrow corridors and small empty rooms offering outstanding views. We are alone and just as we start to wonder if we've seen everything, the guardian appears on cue to lead us through locked doors into rooms with intricate mirror work, colored glass and wall paintings of vibrant color. Behind one pair of double doors is the entire Kama Sutra painted on 4 walls, in pristine condition.
Hidden Kama Sutra panel, Juna Mahal, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Hidden Kama Sutra panel, Juna Mahal, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Juna Mahal, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Juna Mahal, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Juna Mahal, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Juna Mahal, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Juna Mahal, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

Juna Mahal, Dungarpur, Rajasthan

People often ask what is our favorite place in India. Tough choice, but Udaipur, the city that sits on Lake Pichola is definitely a contender.
Lake Pichola, Udaipur, Rajasthan (taken from our hotel room)

Lake Pichola, Udaipur, Rajasthan (taken from our hotel room)

From the smallest hotel to the grandest palace, all have rooftop terraces overlooking the Lake Palace, an 18th century royal summer residence cum luxury hotel and one of the backdrops for the legendary Bond film Octopussy, that floats in the center of the lake. For die-hard fans, the film is screened in a number of bars and restaurants EVERY night.
Lake Palace Hotel, Udaipur, Rajasthan

Lake Palace Hotel, Udaipur, Rajasthan

The Jagat Niwas Hotel, 2 converted havelis (mansions) is a lovely mid-range option with a multi-level rooftop restaurant beautifully lit with mini white lights and candles at night. Our 'Heritage' room has a cosy bay window facing the lake.
Our room, Jagat Niwas Palace Hotel, Udaipur, Rajasthan (49 euros)

Our room, Jagat Niwas Palace Hotel, Udaipur, Rajasthan (49 euros)

Breakfast area, Jagat Niwas Palace Hotel, Udaipur, Rajasthan

Breakfast area, Jagat Niwas Palace Hotel, Udaipur, Rajasthan

Dining terrace with a view, Jagat Niwas Palace Hotel, Udaipur, Rajasthan

Dining terrace with a view, Jagat Niwas Palace Hotel, Udaipur, Rajasthan

The palaces of Udaipur are filled with an astounding display of riches. The City Palace is the largest in Rajasthan.
City Palace, Udaipur, Rajasthan

City Palace, Udaipur, Rajasthan

City Palace, Udaipur, Rajasthan

City Palace, Udaipur, Rajasthan

We have the privilege of a private tour of the Shiv Niwas Palace Hotel and the Fateh Prakash Palace which occupy one end of the City Palace grounds. The contrast with life in the streets is almost disturbing, but we've been in India for so long now, we are (somewhat) immune to the sounds and smells that accost you at every turn. Still, Udaipur remains a one of the prettiest spots in India.
Shiv Niwas Palace Hotel, Udaipur, Rajasthan

Shiv Niwas Palace Hotel, Udaipur, Rajasthan

Shiv Niwas Palace Hotel, Udaipur, Rajasthan

Shiv Niwas Palace Hotel, Udaipur, Rajasthan

Students, Udaipur, Rajasthan

Students, Udaipur, Rajasthan

Local buses are built for small people and it's a struggle to both fit on the double seat, not-to-mention the calloused knees we're developing from the bump and grind against the seat-back in front. But the discomfort is quickly forgotten as we step down in front of the 15th century Ranakpur (Jain) Temple. An immense marvel of sculpted white marble, its 80 domes are held up by thousands of columns.
Ranakpur Temple, Rajasthan

Ranakpur Temple, Rajasthan

Ranakpur Temple, Rajasthan

Ranakpur Temple, Rajasthan

A shared jeep taxi drops us at the gate of the Ghanerao Royal Castle, the 400 year old home of the royal family. The palace is in ruins, but the Ghanerao family occupies a portion, and 17 rooms have been renovated to accommodate guests. Call it medieval chic. Lousy plumbing, uneven floors and bad lighting, yet our room is charming. We are the only guests amplifying the surreal atmosphere. Although it's more Best Marigold Hotel (minus Dev Patel's passionate manager) it has a certain allure and a bit more soul than some of the other converted palaces we've seen. A short exchange with an unassuming man near the reception is our only encounter aside from the staff. Later we learn, he's the Maharaja.
Road to Ghanerao, Rajasthan

Road to Ghanerao, Rajasthan

Village of Ghanerao, Rajasthan

Village of Ghanerao, Rajasthan

Ghanerao Palace, Rajasthan

Ghanerao Palace, Rajasthan

Our room, Ghanerao Palace, Rajasthan (52 euros)

Our room, Ghanerao Palace, Rajasthan (52 euros)

The freshly-painted yellow palace of Deogarh, with its manicured lane leading to the entrance encompasses the passion of its owner to promote his family's legacy. It's so pretty that we decide to have lunch. By the end of the meal, we are spending the night. Our room, once the king's bathroom, is covered with original wall paintings, a large sitting area and a modern bathroom with a delicate mosaic floor. The royal family is extremely accessible and most hospitable. As we discuss our plans, the Raja, who refuses to be called by his official title, insists that we visit his cousins in a town called Shahpura. As we leave, he asks us if we'd like to attend a royal wedding and we agree to keep in touch. More on this in the next post.
Deogarh Palace, Rajasthan

Deogarh Palace, Rajasthan

Our room, Deogarh Palace, Rajasthan (105 euros)

Our room, Deogarh Palace, Rajasthan (105 euros)

More of our room, Deogarh Palace, Rajasthan (105 euros)

More of our room, Deogarh Palace, Rajasthan (105 euros)

Sheesh Mahal (Hall of Mirrors) Deogarh Palace, Rajasthan

Sheesh Mahal (Hall of Mirrors) Deogarh Palace, Rajasthan

Shahpura Bagh is a late 19th century estate run by an endearing family. The family lives in one house and guests occupy the beautifully appointed spacious rooms of a second. The swimming pool is right out of a Hollywood classic and while it's too cold to swim, the elegant daybeds are just right for lunch.
Pool at Shahpura Bagh Hotel, Rajasthan

Pool at Shahpura Bagh Hotel, Rajasthan

About 20 minutes away is the 17th century Dikola fort which also belongs to the family. We are driven over to watch the sun set. So taken with the view, we hardly notice the activity behind us: a spread of food and drink has been prepared just for us.Picnic at Dikola Fort, near Shahpura, Rajasthan

Picnic at Dikola Fort, near Shahpura, Rajasthan

Village of Shahpura, Rajasthan

Village of Shahpura, Rajasthan

Portrait, village of Shahpura, Rajasthan

Portrait, village of Shahpura, Rajasthan

Meals are taken in the main house and before dinner, we gather with the family for a drink. This night we are the only guests. There are a few big dogs, 70's classics play in the background and as I swirl my wine in a crystal glass, I think how lucky we are. The rates at this hotel are way over our means, but the family offers us a super discount and the next day, the Maharaja invites us to spend a second night!
Our room, Shahpura Bagh Hotel, Rajasthan (special price)

Our room, Shahpura Bagh Hotel, Rajasthan (special price)

After 2 nights of sheer luxury, we get back on a government bus and rattle on over to Bundi. While much of the 17th century palace is dilapidated and closed off, the walls and ceilings of the portion open to the public are covered with frescos in turquoise and gold. There are some of the finest examples of the Bundi school of painting. It should be noted that for the untrained eye, distinguishing the many schools of Indian miniature paintings is a daunting task even when faced with examples of every school under one roof.
Bundi Palace, Rajasthan

Bundi Palace, Rajasthan

Bundi Palace, Rajasthan

Bundi Palace, Rajasthan

Bundi Palace, Rajasthan

Bundi Palace, Rajasthan

Bundi Palace, Rajasthan

Bundi Palace, Rajasthan

From Bundi, it takes an overnight bus to Jodhpur right into an 8 hour train ride to get to Jaisalmer, the most western city in Rajasthan, at the edge of the Thar Desert. Of course, there are flights or express trains if you plan in advance, but we've got time and then there's the budget.
Train to Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

Train to Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

Our room, Oasis Haveli Hotel, Jaisalmer, Rajasthan (24 euros)

Our room, Oasis Haveli Hotel, Jaisalmer, Rajasthan (24 euros)

Milking cows in front of our hotel, Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

Milking cows in front of our hotel, Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

The most striking feature of Rajasthan in general, and Jaisalmer in particular, is the colorful clothing. Perhaps a reaction to the rather desolate landscape, women are draped in vibrant, reds (married), yellows, pinks and oranges. Men wear colorful turbans which denote social status and profession, and like the schools of Indian painting, are replete with subtleties.
Jaisalmer Fort, Rajasthan

Jaisalmer Fort, Rajasthan

Portrait, Rajasthan

Portrait, Rajasthan

Portrait, Rajasthan

Portrait, Rajasthan

Portrait, Rajasthan

Portrait, Rajasthan

The imposing (12th century) Jaisalmer Fort once stood alone in the desert. Now, the city butts right up against the ramparts. An arduous, stone road zigzags through several massive gates leading to the main square and the entrance to the Maharaja's palace. Each successive king added to the 7-story palace and rooms are filled with mirrors, paintings, sculptures and furniture. Every window and terrace offers a splendid view and all these stairs certainly kept people fit.
Jaisalmer Fort, Rajasthan

Jaisalmer Fort, Rajasthan

Jaisalmer Fort, Rajasthan (freezing cold in the morning - hot in the afternoon)

Jaisalmer Fort, Rajasthan (freezing cold in the morning - hot in the afternoon)

Jaisalmer Fort, Rajasthan

Jaisalmer Fort, Rajasthan

Jaisalmer Fort, Rajasthan

Jaisalmer Fort, Rajasthan

Both inside and around the fort, the narrow winding streets are filled with old havelis with intricately carved stone balconies that look like lace. Patwa-ki-Haveli is perhaps the prettiest one in town.
Patwa-ki-Haveli, Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

Patwa-ki-Haveli, Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

Patwa-ki-Haveli, Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

Patwa-ki-Haveli, Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

A haveli in Jaisalmer,Rajasthan

A haveli in Jaisalmer,Rajasthan

A haveli in Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

A haveli in Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

Sunset Point with Jaisalmer Fort in the distance, Rajasthan

Sunset Point with Jaisalmer Fort in the distance, Rajasthan

Selling fruit at night, Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

Selling fruit at night, Jaisalmer, Rajasthan

As we've been moving north the temps have started to dip. It's getting really cold now which is so hard to believe after months and months of sweltering heat. Particularly harsh are the overnight bus rides where there is no heat and sometimes no blankets. We buy a wool shawl to keep us warm which also comes in handy in rickshaws which are completely exposed. Night buses often arrive at destination in the wee hours which is brutal. On one such ride, we step off the bus (4AM) and stumble over to a tea stall filled with men standing around a roaring fire. It's a good 15 minutes before we defrost. We dive under the covers of the Desert Winds hotel in Bikaner fully clothed in our coldest moment yet (15 °C/60 °F in the room).
Warming up at 4AM (<dfn title='41°F'>5 °C</dfn>/<dfn title='4°C'>40 °F</dfn>), Bikaner, Rajasthan

Warming up at 4AM (5 °C/40 °F), Bikaner, Rajasthan

As the sun soars to mid sky, we forget we were ever cold and enter the gorgeous, well-preserved 16th century, Junagarh Fort. As with all forts, the road leading to the entrance has a sharp turn and the thick wood doors have long pieces of pointed iron attached at about 2 meters height, both to deter charging elephants... Over the centuries, kings added their own personal touches and rooms are decorated with sandalwood, ivory, mirrors, colored glass and objects from all over the world. Frescos and paintings in vibrant reds, blues and gold and bas relief sculptures adorn the walls.
Junagarh Fort, Bikaner, Rajasthan

Junagarh Fort, Bikaner, Rajasthan

Junagarh Fort and Palace Bikaner, Rajasthan

Junagarh Fort and Palace Bikaner, Rajasthan

Junagarh Fort and Palace, Bikaner, Rajasthan

Junagarh Fort and Palace, Bikaner, Rajasthan

Junagarh Fort and Palace, Bikaner, Rajasthan

Junagarh Fort and Palace, Bikaner, Rajasthan

Visiting the Temple of Karni Mata, also known as the Rat temple in Deshnok is not my idea. The legend is that a distraught father unable to resuscitate his drowned son declared that everyone in his family would be reincarnated as rats. As with all Hindu temples, shoes must be removed. I venture inside the gates and see a few hundred rats scurrying about. People here think that if a rat touches your feet, you will have good fortune. If you're lucky enough to see one of the rare white rats your spiritual life will be blessed. I don't stick around for either.
Karni Mata (Rat) Temple, Deshnok, Rajasthan

Karni Mata (Rat) Temple, Deshnok, Rajasthan

And here we are again, praying, I mean waiting, for the next bus...
Praying for a bus, Bikaner, Rajasthan

Praying for a bus, Bikaner, Rajasthan

Posted by SpiceChronicles 23:05 Archived in India Comments (10)

Back to India

sunny 27 °C


Returning to Mumbai, feels like coming home. People recognize us on the street, in our favorite restaurants, and the owner of our hotel reprimands us for not giving him notice of our arrival. What a nice feeling. The city seems cooler, less humid and less crowded, but more likely, we've just gotten used to a country of 1.2 billion; 16 million right here. As we navigate between the sidewalk vendors and the motorized traffic of Colaba, the man selling the most ridiculous enormous balloons races towards me certain that I've come back to finally buy one! I decide that Kama Sutra playing cards make for more interesting gifts.

We are taking an overnight bus to mythical Goa. Private (somewhat cleaner & more comfortable) buses depart from points outside the city center and the ticketing agent has arranged our transfer to the pick-up point. Our rickshaw follows a motorcycle best he can. In a flurry of commotion, we are waved onto a local bus as our motorcycle escort barks instructions to the driver. Traffic is at a standstill and we resign ourselves to missing the bus as the ticket collector, juggling 2 mobile phones, gestures at us reassuringly between (and during) calls. Suddenly, he turns, motioning wildly and says, "Don't take tension sir!" leaving us in hysterics over the new phrase that rivals "Sorry sir, kitchen confused!" Ultimately, we arrive over an hour late to our waiting bus.
Sleeper bus

Sleeper bus

Goa evokes images of wide sandy beaches, glorious sunsets and Portuguese heritage. Thankfully, the Portuguese part lives up to the myth. There are a few upscale resorts but the public beaches are more than disappointing. In places like Calangute, hoards of tourists, mostly Indian and Russian, descend upon the beach in swarms. Vendors peddling plastic toys, cheap jewelry and all kinds of fried food, line the main road choked with traffic and fumes. The beach is packed with Indian tourists playing in the water fully-clothed. A handful of scorched tourists bake on sunbeds near the waterline. Even the cows seem put off.
Calangute Beach, Goa

Calangute Beach, Goa

Calangute Beach, Goa

Calangute Beach, Goa

Benaulim Beach, Goa

Benaulim Beach, Goa

Restroom, Arossim Beach, Goa

Restroom, Arossim Beach, Goa

Much more appealing are the brightly painted houses with traditional tile motifs and Portuguese names along the narrow streets of the capital city, Panjim (Panaji). Our Lady of Immaculate Conception casts a long shadow over main street from a hilltop in the center. The atmosphere is relaxed and pleasant. It feels like a small town in Portugal. The few colonial hotels and guesthouses in the neighborhood of Fontainas are charming and very reasonably priced. The only issue is the stench from the river occasionally activated by the wind forcing us to find less quaint but more comfortable accommodation inland.
Panjim, Fontainas neighborhood, Goa

Panjim, Fontainas neighborhood, Goa

Trying to stay dry on a bike in Panjim

Trying to stay dry on a bike in Panjim

Downpour at the fruit market in Panjim

Downpour at the fruit market in Panjim

It is Diwali, the Hindu festival of lights and Indian New Year. Over 4 days, the entire country sparkles with light and festivities. Illuminated colorful paper lanterns hang in doorways, firecrackers pop throughout the night and families gather in celebration of joy, hope, peace and prosperity. In Goa, one tradition honors Lord Krishna's defeat of an evil demon king by building giant (8 meters tall) paper mâché monsters and then burning them.
Diwali festival decorations, Goa

Diwali festival decorations, Goa

Paper mache monster, Diwali festival, Goa

Paper mache monster, Diwali festival, Goa

Visiting the old Portuguese mansions around Goa requires several days with a car and driver. The most famous homes like Braganza, Figueriedo, Alvares, Fernandes and Palacio do Deos in South Goa are easily accessible to the public. Owners & caretakers rely on visitor donations to maintain these properties as the government offers little to no subsidies. Homes are filled with Indo-Portuguese furniture, vast collections of tableware, silver and crystal from Europe and Asia. In general, we are warmly welcomed by elderly women, eager to share their family history, but husbands have passed, children have left, estates have been divided and a sense of melancholy hangs heavily in the air.
Traditional Portuguese home, Goa

Traditional Portuguese home, Goa

From north to south, Goa is dotted with churches from petite whitewashed structures in the smallest of villages to the behemoths of Old Goa.
Church, Goa

Church, Goa

Church, Goa

Church, Goa

Church of St. Francis of Assisi, Old Goa

Church of St. Francis of Assisi, Old Goa

Church in Old Goa

Church in Old Goa

Bride in Margao, Goa

Bride in Margao, Goa

We leave the cozy continental feeling of Goa and head back to Hyderabad where we have been invited to observe one of the most important events of the Islamic calendar, the Day of Ashura.
Waiting room at the long distance bus stand, Goa

Waiting room at the long distance bus stand, Goa

Reserving a seat on the bus

Reserving a seat on the bus

On the 10th day of Muharram, the first month of the Islamic calendar, Shia Muslims commemorate the martyrdom of the Imam Hussein, grandson of Mohammed, at the battle of Karbala (present day Iraq) in 680 AD. Men gather on the floor of the Ashoor Khana (mourning hall) where a man recounts the story of the battle with fierce emotion as the entire audience weeps with empathy. Women, seated of the floor, behind screens, in adjascent rooms, look on crying their souls dry. A procession of men (only) in black follows in the streets, led by men of all ages including very young boys, beating their chests and cutting themselves with sharp blades in honorary self-mutilation. Veiled women, watch discreetly from behind doors and on rooftops.
Burning written wishes before the procession during Muharram, Hyderabad

Burning written wishes before the procession during Muharram, Hyderabad

Muharram procession at Charminar mosque, Hyderabad

Muharram procession at Charminar mosque, Hyderabad

Self-flagellation during Muharram, Hyderabad

Self-flagellation during Muharram, Hyderabad

Self-flagellation during Muharram, Hyderabad

Self-flagellation during Muharram, Hyderabad

Crowd, Muharram, Hyderabad

Crowd, Muharram, Hyderabad

Self-flagellation during Muharram, Hyderabad

Self-flagellation during Muharram, Hyderabad

Blood bath, Muharram, Hyderabad

Blood bath, Muharram, Hyderabad

Ladies, Muharram, Hyderabad

Ladies, Muharram, Hyderabad

In a radical change of decor, we spend a few days visiting the archaeological wonder of Hampi, a UNESCO World Heritage site. Gigantic rock formations dwarf the ruins of the Hindu empire that flourished here from the 14th to 16th century. Hampi Bazaar is the tiny village close to the main sites. In this compact labyrinth of narrow unpaved streets, with small guesthouses, restaurants and shops, cows, pigs and dogs go about their business nibbling on garbage and soaking up the sun as pedestrians and vehicles circumvent. The basic but comfortable Thalik Guest house is run by an unusually enterprising young man with a keen sense of service. At 22 he's already running 2 guesthouses, a restaurant, cybercafe and tours.
Temple at sunset point, Hampi

Temple at sunset point, Hampi

Chariot at Vitthala temple, Hampi

Chariot at Vitthala temple, Hampi

View of Elephant stables, Hampi

View of Elephant stables, Hampi

Shiva underground temple, Hampi

Shiva underground temple, Hampi

View from Mathanga Hill, Hampi

View from Mathanga Hill, Hampi

Kadlekalu (seated) Ganesh, monolithic statue, 4.5 meters tall, Hampi

Kadlekalu (seated) Ganesh, monolithic statue, 4.5 meters tall, Hampi

Virupaksha temple, Hampi

Virupaksha temple, Hampi

Virupaksha temple, Hampi

Virupaksha temple, Hampi

Little girl dressed in her Sunday best to visit the temples, Hampi

Little girl dressed in her Sunday best to visit the temples, Hampi

From Hampi we hire a car and driver for the day (30 eu) to visit the temple complexes of Aihole and Pattadakal (a classified World Heritage site) as well as the cave temples of Badami.
Zebus at work

Zebus at work

Passengers unlimited

Passengers unlimited

Nandi bull in temple at Pattadakal

Nandi bull in temple at Pattadakal

Temple at Pattadakal

Temple at Pattadakal

Temple at Pattadakal

Temple at Pattadakal

Interior cave, Badami

Interior cave, Badami

Ladies visiting the cave temples at Badami

Ladies visiting the cave temples at Badami

Cave temple, Badami

Cave temple, Badami

Daily life, Badami

Daily life, Badami

Daily life, Badami

Daily life, Badami

But the really impressive cave temples are those of Ajanta and Ellora (both classified by UNESCO) reached by day trips from dusty, chaotic Aurangabad, famous for its Bibi-ka-Makbara a scaled-down, far-less bejeweled, but equally grand in its expression of love, replica of the Taj Mahal.Bibi-ka-Makbara, the mini Taj Mahal, Aurangabad

Bibi-ka-Makbara, the mini Taj Mahal, Aurangabad

Bibi-ka-Makbara, Aurangabad

Bibi-ka-Makbara, Aurangabad

Built between the 2nd and 6th centuries, there are no less than 30 Buddhist temples carved into the caves of Ajanta along a horseshoe-shaped ravine. It's a full day of walking up and down steep, uneven steps, shoes on, off, on, off, to admire the frescoes and colorful wall paintings which are remarkably well-preserved.
Ajanta cave temples

Ajanta cave temples

Ajanta cave temples

Ajanta cave temples

Ajanta cave temples

Ajanta cave temples

Ajanta cave temples - some visitors opt to be carried

Ajanta cave temples - some visitors opt to be carried

Over the next 5 centuries, the 34 caves of Ellora were carved into temples and monasteries by Buddhists, Hindus and Jains. It's almost too much for one day. The standout is the Kailasa Temple, an astonishing Hindu sanctuary carved from one mighty rock by a crew of 7000 over a century and a half. Let the photos speak because my jaw is still dropped.
Ellora cave temples

Ellora cave temples

Ellora cave temples

Ellora cave temples

Ellora cave temples

Ellora cave temples

Ellora, Kailasa cave temple

Ellora, Kailasa cave temple

Ellora, Kailasa cave temple

Ellora, Kailasa cave temple

Ellora cave temples

Ellora cave temples

Ellora cave temples

Ellora cave temples

Perched on a plateau overlooking a valley lies the fortified town of Mandu. With not much left of the walls or gates, and all of one intersection, it's hard to even call this a village, yet the splendid palaces, mosques, temples and tombs all within proximity are testament to a rich history disputed by rajas, muslims and moghuls between the 10th and 18th centuries. Moreover, it's easy to visit the various sites on foot or bicycle. Accommodations on the other hand, are nothing to write home about.
Jahaz Mahal (palace), Mandu

Jahaz Mahal (palace), Mandu

Hindola Mahal (palace), Mandu

Hindola Mahal (palace), Mandu

Hoshang Shah's Tomb, Mandu

Hoshang Shah's Tomb, Mandu

Jami Masjid (mosque), Mandu

Jami Masjid (mosque), Mandu

The ghats (stairs leading to the water) and temples that line the banks of the sacred Narmada River, under the imposing 16th century fort in the town of Maheshwar, have long welcomed pilgrims. However, it was the 18th century (people's) Queen Ahilyabai of the Holkar family who built, among others, the palace, today the royal family's home and a luxury hotel, within the fort walls. The highlight, despite the ear-splitting hammer of the outboard motor propelling our waterlogged boat, is the view of the fort from the river in the late afternoon. The panorama from our cozy room is pretty good too!
Maheshwar

Maheshwar

Ghats (steps leading to the river), Maheshwar

Ghats (steps leading to the river), Maheshwar

View of Maheshwar from the river

View of Maheshwar from the river

View of Maheshwar ghats from the river

View of Maheshwar ghats from the river

Bathers, Maheshwar

Bathers, Maheshwar

Egg vendor, Maheshwar

Egg vendor, Maheshwar

Mosque, Maheshwar

Mosque, Maheshwar

Dyeing cotton, Maheshwar

Dyeing cotton, Maheshwar

Room with a view, Hotel Raj Palace (20 eu), Maheshwar

Room with a view, Hotel Raj Palace (20 eu), Maheshwar

Known as Little Varanasi, Omkareshwar is a small island in the shape of the Om sign. Pilgrims come by the thousands to bathe in the water and pray in the surrounding temples. It is neither the prettiest, nor cleanest place we've visited and the enormous dam that sits on the perimeter like a digital backdrop is utterly surreal.
Omkareshwar

Omkareshwar

Drying dung patties, Omkareshwar

Drying dung patties, Omkareshwar

There are only a few hotels and for 16 euros, our "super deluxe" room includes a (thankfully) motionless bat lying on the bed! Later, as we kick back after a long, hot day, a lizard, the size of my hand, drops out of the A/C with a loud thud, stunned and frozen!
Hotel in Omkareshwar

Hotel in Omkareshwar

On an overnight bus to Baroda (Vadodara), as is often the case, the bus stops in the middle of nowhere. The choice is simple: go or hold it in for no telling how long, or how disgusting the eventual facilities may be. So, I walk far enough from the bus to find an isolated place when suddenly 2 ladies position themselves right next to me! It's so shocking yet it is a moment of female bonding. We walk back to the bus giggling with/at each other, I'm not really sure.

The 19th century Laxmi Vilas Palace, built by a British architect, with a mere 117 rooms is still home to the royal family of Baroda. A portion is open to the public.
Laxmi Vilas Palace, Baroda (Vadodara)

Laxmi Vilas Palace, Baroda (Vadodara)

Mahabat Maqbara mausoleum, Junagadh

Mahabat Maqbara mausoleum, Junagadh

Also classified as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, Champaner, the ancient capital of Gujarat and Pavagadh the sacred hill above it are about an hour from Baroda. The ruins of half a dozen mosques, poorly indicated on a map, delineate the boundaries of the city. That compass saves us. The architecture is an interesting mix of Hindu and Islamic styles.
Lila Gumbaj Ki Masjid (mosque), Champaner

Lila Gumbaj Ki Masjid (mosque), Champaner

Jami Masjid (mosque), Champaner

Jami Masjid (mosque), Champaner

The top of Pavagadh has several Hindu and Jain temples and is a pilgrimage site which can be reached on foot or by (Swiss built) cable car, but local tourists seem most interested in the kitsch photo studios that line the cobblestone streets.
Jain temple, Pavagadh

Jain temple, Pavagadh

Studio photography, Pavagadh

Studio photography, Pavagadh

Like Goa, the small town of Diu on the Oman Sea (southern tip of Gujarat) was a Portuguese enclave until 1961 when India reclaimed the territory. The season hasn't quite started yet which has its pros and cons. We visit the fort and churches practically alone but finding a ride proves difficult. By the sea, the king prawns are scrumptious!
St. Thomas Church, Diu

St. Thomas Church, Diu

Diu

Diu

Old Portuguese house, Diu

Old Portuguese house, Diu

Old Portuguese house, Diu

Old Portuguese house, Diu

Pimp my ride

Pimp my ride

The only remaining wild Asian lions (different characteristics than their African counterparts) in India can be found in Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary. Closed for 5 months during the monsoon, the sleepy town is swinging into a new season. Getting into the park is no simple affair as the number of jeeps per time slot is limited and there's a mafia-like organization for procuring the permits which consists of securing a jeep, then paying a gypsy to stand in line for you from midnight to 4am, whereby you (in our case two young Israelis looking to share costs) then take place for the remaining (freezing cold) hour or two until the office opens. Jeeps then gather around then entrance and after checking and rechecking paperwork, are allowed to enter for precisely 3 hours. We get lucky and spot 2 lions waking up with the sunrise.
Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary

Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary

Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary

Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary

Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary

Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary

Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary

Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary

Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary

Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary

Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary

Sasan Gir Wildlife Sanctuary

Lords Hotel, Sasan Gir (60 eu including breakfast and dinner for 2)

Lords Hotel, Sasan Gir (60 eu including breakfast and dinner for 2)

Additional seating

Additional seating

Typical view from the bus

Typical view from the bus

Nomads

Nomads

The town of Jamnagar is famous for a Hindu temple where a mantra has been chanted 24/7 since 1964, but the real stars of this town are the beautiful Jain temples in the center.
Shantinath (Jain) temple, Jamnagar

Shantinath (Jain) temple, Jamnagar

Interior Shantinath (Jain) temple, Jamnagar

Interior Shantinath (Jain) temple, Jamnagar

View of public urinals from hotel, Jamnagar

View of public urinals from hotel, Jamnagar

Delicious, Gujarati Thali

Delicious, Gujarati Thali

In 2001, a devastating earthquake struck the region of Kutch killing some 30,000 people. Despite severe damage, the extraordinarily ornate palaces of the capital city Bhuj, still stand.
Prag Mahal (palace), Bhuj

Prag Mahal (palace), Bhuj

Prag Mahal (palace), Bhuj

Prag Mahal (palace), Bhuj

Prag Mahal (palace), Bhuj

Prag Mahal (palace), Bhuj

King's bedroom, Aina Mahal (palace), Bhuj

King's bedroom, Aina Mahal (palace), Bhuj

VVIP Parking, Bhuj

VVIP Parking, Bhuj

An hour away in the coastal town of Mandvi we visit the royal family's summer palace, and a couple beaches nearby. In contrast to the deserted private beach, the public beach is humming with activity. Families play in the water, vendors peddle food and toys, and young boys offer camel and pony rides. A jeep pulling a parasail drives by on land as a jet ski whizzes by in the water.
Mandvi Beach

Mandvi Beach

Mandvi Beach

Mandvi Beach

Mandvi Beach

Mandvi Beach

Mandvi Beach

Mandvi Beach

Mandvi Beach

Mandvi Beach

Mandvi Beach

Mandvi Beach

T-Shirt

T-Shirt

But the most interesting site in Mandvi is the shipyard with the skeletons of gigantic wooden boats under construction. No one is working today leaving plenty of room for a flock of Pink Flamingoes to wade in the shallow water nearby.
Shipyard, Mandvi

Shipyard, Mandvi

Pink Flamingos, Mandvi

Pink Flamingos, Mandvi

Posted by SpiceChronicles 05:33 Archived in India Comments (11)

Bali Blues

sunny 30 °C

Arriving in Sanur on the southeast coast feels like most resorts in Florida. Traffic jam on the main street crammed with shops and restaurants and a beachfront with a path for cyclists and pedestrians in front of hotels lined up like dominos. What? This isn't Florida? Well, you could have fooled me. The only giveaway is that the beaches are nicer... in Florida...
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The most famous beaches, Kuta, Legian and Seminyak are on the southwest coast. We figure we should at least see what all the hype is about so we haggle with some drivers before hailing a metered taxi to brave an hour of intense traffic. I get the beach party allure that Kuta might have for the 20-something crowd, but here too the beach is disappointing. Swanky Seminyak next door, reminds me of the South of France in the summer. Hardly an inch of free sand or sidewalk which isn't surprising considering the local population of Bali is around 4 million and the number of tourists is 3.2 million per year.

Thinking we must have chosen the wrong area of Bali, we hire a car and driver for the day to look for the Bali we all expect. Every adult male it seems is a driver/guide. Taxi sir? Taxi madam? Ubud? Monkey Temple? Rice fields? The chorus of offers is deafening. At first you're polite, but after 50 "no thank yous", prompted by the drivers themselves, you switch to "maybe tomorrow."

We don't find the postcard beaches, but here and there we do find some nice spots including the lovely Tirta Empul Temple in Tampaksiring famous for its holy spring water. Bathers move down the line of fountainheads in a ballet of gesture and prayer.
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We inch our way through Ubud in traffic that rivals some of the world's best and at first glance we wonder what the draw to this place is. We visit the requisite Monkey Temple hoping that we won't be jumped by primates with a mission, but they're smart enough to go after the tourists wielding bananas. The park is actually quite pretty and we stumble upon a ceremony.
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Balinese architecture Is beautiful and no matter the size, every home has its own family temple with intricately carved columns and figures. Even the smallest guesthouses have elaborate entrances.
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Every day offerings are placed on the ground in front of homes, temples, shops even hotel rooms to honor the good spirits and fend off the bad. These small, handcrafted leaf packets filled with a variety of ingredients including, flowers, rice, nuts, fish and incense are hard to avoid stepping on. Luckily, once the ritual has been performed it really doesn't matter.
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The picturesque Jatiluwah rice fields in Tabanan, about 2 hours north of Denpasar, are classified by UNESCO as a Cultural Landscape for their traditional Subak irrigation system. We spend a few hours walking along paved paths admiring the ingenuity of this ancient, eco-friendly technique passed down through generations.
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The coastline along the east coast is rugged. We stop at a few places like Tulamben, famous for its shipwreck which lures experienced divers prepared to battle the harsh current, and Ahmed a tiny village known for free diving and yoga, but no area particularly inspires us, so we decide to try some of the small islands just off the coast.
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Everything in Bali is negotiable and choosing the boat to take you across a fairly treacherous corridor is daunting. Foreign-owned private companies dispute the boardwalk for your business asking exorbitant prices, while the locally run companies seem disorganized leaving you to wonder how closely price and safety are related. With the luxury of time, we observe several operators and ultimately decide to support the local guys, who it turns out, offer the exact same service. And no matter what price you pay, you will have to get your feet wet. The boats get right up to the beach, but you have to wade in, between breaking waves to get on. Of course the locals do this with a bit more finesse and we're thankful that they are in charge of luggage.
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It's a 30 minute smooth ride to Lembongan a small island where the scooter rules. A few small trucks are authorized to shuttle tourists and baggage. We check-in to the Pondok Arsa Santhi Hotel (20 euros per night/double)
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Though not on the beach, the bungalow, next to the pool, is spanking new, with a nice outdoor bathroom. We last one night: The noise of scooters and motorcycles is unbearable. We find a bungalow at Mega Cottages (22 euros per night/double) on the beach for a few days, and then snag the last available bungalow at Yogi Guest House (22 euros per night/double) where we settle into an extremely relaxed rhythm.
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To visit the interior of the island and beaches farther away, still in search of fine white sand, we rent a scooter for the day. We cross the rickety bridge to Ceningan a smaller island with just a couple of hotels and numerous seaweed farming operations.
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The seaweed cultivated here is intended for use in beauty products.
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At the end of the day, we decide that we're happier on our beachfront even though swimming is a challenge in the extremely shallow coral-filled water.
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Happy hour is particularly pretty on Lembongan with lots of nice bars and restos to enjoy sunset followed by a movie at Jungut Batu, a covered outdoor theater with comfy bean bags and good food. Every morning the owner posts the movie of the evening. The show always starts with a surfing flick.
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A communal cremation will take place in a few days. Poorer Balinese families bury the deceased until they can raise enough money for the Ngaben (cremation ceremony). On this day, there are about 20 families that will participate. For one family it has taken 7 years of saving. The remains are placed in a large funeral tower made of wood and paper mâché which sits on a thick bamboo frame. With a band of musicians playing bells and beating drums, 40 - 50 men hoist the structure in the air, twirl around and parade it up and down the main street, to confuse the spirits of the deceased and allow them to move on to the next life. On either side another group of men carry 2 bulls high over their heads in a similar trance. The procession carries on for 2 hours in the grueling sun with onlookers throwing refreshing water on the men and fanning them with large sheets of woven palm.
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Next a procession of the families bring offerings and possessions of their loved ones which are placed inside the tower and blessed by holy men. Two young boys holding symbolic birds are attached to either side of the tower and once again the structure is carried to a timber platform where a dozen brightly-decorated, hollow horses await. Each family recuperates the remains and carries them one final time to be placed inside the horses. A series of ceremonial gestures follows - sprinkling water, placing leaves, burning incense, and blessings - before setting the entire line of horses ablaze. Though the fire will burn for hours, the families take leave as soon as the flames ignite. Not a tear is shed. This is a time for celebration knowing that the deceased will return in a new incarnation.
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Visa extension requirements take us back to Bali. This time, the sea is raging, with waves pounding the boat from the side. It's like being inside a car wash. Everyone holds their breath as we slam forward to Padang Bay. Safely ashore, we decide to try the beaches of Nusa Dua and finally discover a beach with fine sand and turquoise water. BUT... this area is behind security gates. Anyone can enter, but you'd hardly know you're in Bali. It's just one international hotel after another. If you're looking for Starbucks and a deal on Polo Ralph Lauren, you've come to the right place.
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About 40 minutes away the Uluwatu temple sits on a cliff overlooking the ocean. It draws big crowds especially at sunset, but the highlight is the Kecak dance of the monkeys. The "music" is actually a rather impressive breathing technique performed by a choir of men.
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Crossing the seas yet again, we opt for Gili Air, one of 3 small islands right off the island of Lombok, about 1.5 hours from Bali. This boat ride is more like a rave party. We are the last to board and the party is in full swing but I'm pretty certain it's our seniority that causes the attendant to usher us right into the Capitan's deck. As the door shuts behind us muffling the Ibiza soundtrack, we settle in to thick leather couches for the ride wondering how we got so lucky.
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There are no cars on Gili Air, just bicycles and horse-drawn carts. The Elephant House Bungalow is a 5 minute walk from the ferry. Our bungalow is nicely equipped with a roof terrace/lounge. If it wasn't so hot and humid you could sleep outside.
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It takes all of 1.5 hours to walk around the island. Here too, the beach is painful underfoot, but the water is clear. Most places have gazebo-like platforms at water's edge and the rhythm of life, which even suits the mosquitos, is even mellower than Lembongan. Our favorite place for a cappuccino is Mowie's Bar, just steps from our hotel on the beach. However, this blissful place is short-lived. Some reservation confusion but more importantly, really loud music every night, forces us to pack up once again and head back to Bali. At this point, we have a nice relationship and volume discount with the local ferry guys.
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We check back into our simple yet comfortable guest house, The Little Pond in Sanur (18 euros per night/double), and head to our favorite massage place next door. 6 euros for an hour head to toe. Divine.
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With just few more days to spend in Bali, we decide to return to Ubud to visit a few more sites in the north central part of the island including Ulun Danu temple which sits on Beratan Lake in Bedugul and the Taman Ayun temple in Mengwi.
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Although Bali did not live up to our expectations as a beach paradise, it did whet our desire to see more and we plan to return to Indonesia in the future to visit Sulawesi island for the funeral ceremonies, Komodo for the dragon, Kalimantan, the Indonesian part of Borneo, and much more...
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Posted by SpiceChronicles 23:33 Archived in Indonesia Comments (8)

Southern India

sunny 38 °C

Everything in southern India has a different flavor. From the language, primarily Tamil to the vegetarian cuisine - thalis and dosas, to the terrain. Days are spent coming from or going to visit temples of which there are literally thousands, some classified by UNESCO. A6DA48D1B6127DFE1DDF4667A05A595F.jpg
As if Indian city names weren't complicated enough, sometimes the new names aren't so different Pondicherry - Puducherry, Mahabalipuram - Mamallapuram. Thankfully, contractions are popular. Despite the tongue-twisting name, Mamallapuram (Mal), a little under 2 hours south of Chennai (Madras) is classified as a world heritage site for its temples and natural rock formations. The vestiges of the 7th century Shore Temple dedicated to Shiva sit at water's edge. It's hard to tell if it's being swallowed up or regurgitated by the sea.A6D7159EA0EAFB517E481C1F05C4B45C.jpgA6D6AA79DA717BA850D25103FD48DBF3.jpg
A short rickshaw ride takes us to the 5 Rathas (chariots) Temple, a group of sanctuaries each dedicated to a Hindu god with a sculpted animal standing guard. Most remarkable is that each temple and figure is carved from a single piece of stone. This archeological wonder was dug out of the sand by the British some 200 years ago.
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Carved into a long rock wall along one of the main streets in town are scenes of daily life and Hindu mythology.
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A bit further down the road, looking as if it's about to roll, sits an enormous rock called, get this... Krishna's Butter Ball!
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The expansive Arunachaleswar Temple (dedicated to Shiva in his incarnation as fire) sits in the town of Thiruvannamalai at the base of a dormant volcano. It has four particularly tall gopurams (typical Hindu stepped tower gate). On full moon and other holy days, people come to worship at the temple and climb the volcano; barefoot in the blazing sun, of course. During the annual festival of the Nov/Dec full moon, millions of pilgrims make the journey.
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Thanjavur, once the capital of the Chola empire is home to the 11th century Brihadishwara Temple, also a Unesco World Heritage site. The thick fort walls dissolve from beige to pink, orange and red tones as the sun shifts overhead.
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As with all Hindu temples, shoes must be removed. Locals don't seem to have trouble walking on blistering hot stone, while I hop around trying to catch bits of the worn-out runners that have been laid out. When there's no carpet, I hug walls trying to fit my feet into the thin crisp shadow of the midday sun. In some areas, a strip of ground has been painted white and what a difference that makes. On the rare occasion that I remember, I pack a pair of socks, but not all temples allow them. In the center of the complex stands a 25 ton Nandi (Shiva's bull) carved out of a single stone. The arcade that stretches around the huge complex is filled with sculptures and colorful paintings of Shiva.
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Pondicherry or Pondy, is a bustling chaotic town on the southeast coast. But crossing over the canal to the neighborhood bordering the sea is like stepping into 18th century France. Large houses, freshly-painted pale yellow, topped with red-tile roofs, sit on tree-lined streets named Alexandre Dumas and Romain Rolland.
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The elegant Hotel L'Orient, has been lovingly restored with muted colored walls, 4 poster beds, polished wood floors and impossibly high ceilings making you feel like a veritable French aristocrat.
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A few more hot bus rides down the southeast coast lands us in Tamil Nadu and in particular the Chettinad region, the enclave of the Chettiars, a large clan of 9 families who made their fortunes in international business and finance. They built expansive mansions in their native villages (Karaikkudi, Kothamangalam, Pallatur, Kanadukathan,...) with imported Burmese teak, Italian marble, Japanese tiles and Belgian mirrors.
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The streets are long and straight, lined with expansive dilapidated homes. It feels like a ghost town and looking towards an intersection, I half expect to see tumbleweed blow by. The silence is deafening. This cannot be India.
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The entrance to our hotel, Saratha Vilas, is unassuming, yet a push through large wood doors into the partially covered courtyard and the grandeur of the place unfolds.
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Oversized daybeds amid lush greenery lead up a few steps to the columned portico standing on polished black (Belgian) tiles. Stepping into what might be the foyer in a European home, feels like walking into Versailles.
Through large windows, designed for air circulation, on the far wall, a succession of spaces recedes into the distance.
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Most Chettiar mansions have a similar layout based on Vastu Shastra, the Tamil version of Feng Shui. Oddly, this front room was the marriage hall and is wide rather than long. There must be 20 meters looking left and right, with large chandeliers, mirrors, paintings and a polished marble floor. Behind a painted screen at one end is our room. The key itself is a conversation piece.
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Each day at 7 am the women who work at the hotel draw a design on the floor in the main courtyard. Made with a paste of white rice the Kolam is believed to bring prosperity. Throughout southern India millions of women draw these designs in front of their homes and shops every day.
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There are apparently, over 10,000 Chettiar mansions in the area yet only a handful have been restored. However, Chettinad is quickly gaining popularity as a tourist destination and renovation projects are proceeding in all the villages. The work undertaken by the two French architects who run Saratha Vilas is by far the most thoroughly accomplished. A masterpiece of understated elegance, honoring the traditional style and craftsmanship of a Chettiar home while adding just enough modern conveniences and personal taste to create a contemporary luxury accommodation. But the master plan, imagined by Michel and Bernard and well underway, is for the entire Chettinad region to be recognized by UNESCO as a World Heritage site.
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In the small village of Athangudi, craftsmen make the distinctive tiles found in all the Chettiar mansions. A piece of glass is placed in a mould and colored powders are poured in. The mould is then removed and the pattern is covered with a layer of sand on both sides and set aside to rest for a day before being placed in water for 2 days. Once dry, the glass is removed. Working in pairs, tile-makers complete about 250 tiles per day.
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There are many Hindu temples in the area. Each bordering a large water tank. Staring down the steep steps into the virtually empty basin, it's hard to imagine it rains here at all.
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In addition to the wealthy Chettiars, the villagers of this region have also contributed to making this area unique in India. Every year between May and August, one after another villages honor Ayyanar, the god who protects the villagers. Pottery offerings in the form of horses, cows, elephants, goats, and human figures are carried in a procession to the village temple where they are arranged in neat rows on the temple grounds.
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Each year, new offerings are added and as the years go by, nature grows on and around these delicate objects. Scattered throughout the region are sanctuaries dedicated to Ayyanar, some in the form of temples while others lie in a sacred forest or clearing as designated by the living gods, men who through trance transmit Ayyanar's desires.
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The most popular offering is a horse and in the potters' village a very special horse is made each year. This one stands 7 meters tall and took 22 days to make. It is carried by 50 men who relay themselves over the 5 km walk to its resting place at the temple next to those of previous years. As with many local traditions, there are only a few families of potters left as younger generations are leaving for work in bigger cities.
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For a brief escape from the oppressive heat of the south, we head to India's most famous hill station, Ooty.
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Following rave reviews from our favorite guidebook, we take the vintage miniature steam train on a 5 hour putter into the mountains. It turns out, this is a popular attraction with Indian tourists who arrive in droves, laden with feasts for the journey. This ol' engine needs water to propel her up the mountain and we stop at almost every station to top off and check that all parts are attached and functioning properly. At every halt, the local tourists bound off the train to take pictures and eat.
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In horror, we watch as they throw garbage on the ground. Indians firmly believe that they are providing work for others. And while the mentality towards waste management in general is slowly changing, the country remains quite filthy and it's going to take generations to clean up.
The Garden Manor hotel near the botanical gardens in Ooty is cute and comfortable. It's the best thing about the town, well almost. The kitchen is a disaster. After several unsuccessful attempts to find an edible breakfast we pack up and leave.
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The bus to Mysore is a winding ride through the mountains with a rare sighting. As is often the case, we are the only tourists on the bus and no matter how crowded, seats are always found for us. Sitting up front offers a great view. A few Spotted deer on the left, the occasional elephant on the right and then... a leopard! Over the last year we have bounced through many a reserve hoping for a glimpse of elusive wildlife, and here on a public bus, for all of 1 euro, a leopard casually crosses the road before us!
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The centerpiece of Mysore is the Maharaja's Palace. The building that stands today was built in the early 1900s after fire destroyed the original palace. It is an impressive monument filled with royal history and intricate architectural details. Inside, photos are strictly prohibited, one wonders why, but the magical moment comes one night at the end of the regular sound and light show when the 100,000+ bulbs that frame the entire monument shine brightly for exactly 2 minutes before dramatically powering off in unison.
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The Parklane is a quirky, comfortable hotel. The restaurant has a reputation for good food and does a bustling business with locals. We will remember it for the one slip-up at breakfast which coined a phrase: When served severely moldy bread, our waiter rushed back with fresh slices and said, "Sorry madame, kitchen confused!"
The Keshava Temple in Somnathpur is worth the 45 minute ride out of Mysore. Built in the 13th century, it is one of three temples from the Hoysala period classified as a Unesco World Heritage site. The temple sits on a raised star-shape platform with every inch inside and out covered with carved figures of gods, goddesses, musicians, animals, and scenes from ancient Hindu texts called Puranas. The ceilings are carved with the various stages of a blooming banana flower and the names of all the sculptors are carved into the temple.
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The fortified city of Srirangapatnam, the official capital for most of South India in the 18th century, is most famous for the epic encounter between Tipu Sultan and the British at the end of the 19th century, in favor of the Brits. Only parts of the walls and gates still stand, but a mosque and a temple remain. Nearby, is the Sultan's summer residence, Daria Daulat Bagh, an ornate palace largely made of wood, covered with murals depicting daily life and important military campaigns.
But the really beautiful site outside of Mysore is the Ranganathittu Bird Sanctuary where in addition to flocks of wild storks, Ibises and Cormorants, we are mesmerized by the giant crocodiles soaking up the sun on the banks and patrolling the river.
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With our visas about to expire we take a train from Trichy to Chennai intending to fly to Bali though one of us is denied exit from India on a technicality so small even the immigration officer has to use a magnifying glass to point it out! The red tape is so thick, it takes one week, many documents and several office visits to obtain the required paperwork.
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impressions of Bali coming... eventually!

Posted by SpiceChronicles 00:18 Archived in India Comments (3)

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